Wednesday, April 19, 2017

LDAP

TCP 389 and 636 refer to insecure versus secure LDAP, Lightweight Directory Access Protocol. This is used in Active Directory. Active Directory and Microsoft Windows is an LDAP directory store. We have open LDAP in the Linux UNIX world; we have Open Directory in the OS X world. It's a directory database where you can manage users, groups, computers, and so forth centrally. Ports 427 and 548 are the Apple Filing Protocol used for file sharing. This was used many, many years ago in Apple-based peer-to-peer networks, but fortunately Apple got on the TCP/IP train within a few years. So you'll find nowadays that if you're doing file sharing on OS X, I can tell you you will be using SMB when you're communicating with Windows boxes, and you'll probably be using Network File System or NFS when you're doing file sharing with other OS X or Linux machines. Interestingly, NFS is not one of the protocols that we need to know for the A+.

SMB is actually the older name for another protocol that does the same exact thing, Windows-based file sharing. It's called the Common Internet File System, or C-I-F-S, CIFS. CIFS and SMB use the same TCP ports, so it's not like you're having to learn two totally separate protocols. Okay, now that I finished that, let's go to the bottom of the table, and we'll wrap up with TCP 3389. This is, even though it's not in the well-known range, it's been so standardized it's used de facto around the world for Windows Remote Desktop sharing. In fact, the protocol is RDP that stands for Remote Desktop Protocol.




APIs - REST API